The Flood continues

Anybody else notice the explosion in edited collections over the past X number of years? I assume it has to something to do with the publishing market, but I wouldn’t be surprised if changes in academia, namely the recent incentivization of frequent publishing in English higher ed, as well as various EU government funding streams, have encouraged lots of European scholars to host conferences and publish the results. But what do I know.

And by way of segue (note, not Segway), how about some recent publications in an EMEMH vein? How about if I put them in no particular order and provide almost no additional commentary?

Tracy, James D. Balkan Wars: Habsburg Croatia, Ottoman Bosnia, and Venetian Dalmatia, 1499–1617. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2016.

Davies, Brian L. The Russo-Turkish War, 1768-1774: Catherine II and the Ottoman Empire. London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2016.
Brittan, Owen. “Subjective Experience and Military Masculinity at the Beginning of the Long Eighteenth Century, 1688-1714.” Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 40, no. 2 (June 1, 2017): 273–90.
El Hage, Fadi. Vendôme : La gloire ou l’imposture. Paris: BELIN, 2016.
Close, Christopher W. “City-States, Princely States, and Warfare: Corporate Alliance and State Formation in the Holy Roman Empire (1540–1610).” European History Quarterly 47, no. 2 (April 1, 2017): 205–28.
Black, Jeremy. Plotting Power: Strategy in the Eighteenth Century. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2017.
Murdoch, Steve, Alexia Nora Lina Grosjean, and Siobhan Marie Talbott. “Drummer Major James Spens: Letters from a Common Soldier Abroad, 1617-1632.” Northern Studies 47 (December 2015): 76–101.
McCluskey, Phil. “ ‘Enemies of Their Patrie’: Savoyard Identity and the Dilemmas of War, 1690-1713.” In Performances of Peace: Utrecht 1713, 69–91. Leiden: Brill, 2015.
Probably the most military-themed of the dozen chapters, based off a conference of the same name.
Berkovich, Ilya. Motivation in War: The Experience of Common Soldiers in Old-Regime Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017.
James, Alan. “Rethinking the Peace of Westphalia: Toward a Theory of Early-Modern Warfare.” In Aspects of Violence in Renaissance Europe, edited by Jonathan Davies. Ashgate Publishing, 2013.
Woodcock, Matthew. “Tudor Soldier-Authors and the Art of Military Autobiography.” In Representing War and Violence, 1250-1600, edited by Joanna Bellis and Laura Slater. Boydell Press, 2016.
Several other chapters in the collection deal with medieval warfare also.
Steen, Jasper Van der. Memory Wars in the Low Countries, 1566-1700. Leiden; Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, 2015.
Fulton, Robert. “Crafting a Site of State Information Management: The French Case of the Dépôt de La Guerre.” French Historical Studies 40, no. 2 (April 1, 2017): 215–40.
Manning, Roger. War and Peace in the Western Political Imagination: From Classical Antiquity to the Age of Reason. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2016.
Abel, Jonathan. Guibert: Father of Napoleon’s Grande Armée. University of Oklahoma Press, 2016.
Van der Linden, David. “Memorializing the Wars of Religion in Early Seventeenth-Century French Picture Galleries.” Renaissance Quarterly 70, no. 1 (2017): 132–78.
Asbach, Olaf, and Peter Schröder, eds. The Ashgate Research Companion to the Thirty Years’ War. Farnham, Surrey, England ; Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing, 2014.

Blakemore, Richard J., and Elaine Murphy. The British Civil Wars at Sea, 1638-1653. Boydell Press, 2017.

Linnarsson, Magnus. “Unfaithful and Expensive – but Absolutely Necessary: Perceptions of Mercenaries in Swedish War Policy, 1621–1636.” Revue d’Histoire nordique 18 (2015): 51–73.
Tolley, Stewart. “In Praise of General Stanhope: Reputation, Public Opinion and the Battle of Almenar, 1710-1733.” British Journal for Military History 3 (2017): 1–21.
Vo-Ha, Paul. Rendre les armes – Le sort des vaincus XVI-XVIIe siècles. Champ Vallon, 2017.
Forssberg, Anna Maria. “The Information State: War and Communication in Sweden during the 17th Century.” In (Re-)Contextualizing Literary and Cultural History, n.d.
Murphy, Neil. “Violence, Colonization and Henry VIII’s Conquest of France, 1544–1546.” Past & Present 233, no. 1 (November 1, 2016): 13–51.
Langley, Chris R. “Caring for Soldiers, Veterans and Families in Scotland, 1638–1651.” History 102, no. 349 (January 1, 2017): 5–23.
Ede-Borrett, Stephen. The Army of James II, 1685-1688: The Birth of the British Army. Helion and Company, 2017.
Sherer, Idan. Warriors for a Living: The Experience of the Spanish Infantry during the Italian Wars, 1494-1559. Brill Academic Publishers, 2017.
Houston, Amy. “The Faithful City Defended and Delivered: Cultural Narratives of Siege Warfare in France, 1553-1591.” Archiv Für Reformationsgeschichte/Archive for Reformation History 107, no. 1 (October 2016).
Paton, Kevin, and Martin Cook. “The 1560 Fortifications and Siege of Leith: Archaeological Evidence for a New Transcription of the Cartographic Evidence.” Post-Medieval Archaeology 50, no. 2 (May 3, 2016): 264–78.
And then we come to the editorial commentary.
Jacob, Frank, and Gilmar Visoni-Alonzo. The Military Revolution in Early Modern Europe: A Revision. London: Palgrave Pivot, 2016.
Sounds intriguing yes? I thought so too. So I bought it – $55 for hardcover isn’t too bad, I thought to myself. But what I failed to do, unfortunately, is to look closely at the page length. To save you the trouble, here’s a comparison of a few “randomly-chosen” books:
Pivot Photo.jpeg
Yep, I just spent $55 plus tax for a measly 101 pages (88 of actual text). The importance of an imprint.
For comparison, feel free to reread my earlier thoughts on EMEMH publishing, which seemed to be going in the opposite direction of costlier and deeper: here and here. It may just be me, but I’m not sure I like the direction of this Pivot.
We could apply the Ostwald Test: Historiography for Dummies, but I’m not sure what the pages-to-coverage ratio would be for a book that ranges from the Classical world to World War II, from Tenochtitlan to Mysore to Korea, and from Alexander the Great to Leopold III of Austria to Koxinga. All in 101 pages. Onnekink’s Reinterpreting the Dutch Forty Years War is a bit longer and more focused ($55 for 138 pages), but it’s the principle of the thing: I’d rather spend $100 for a 300-page book that delves into a subject I’m interested in.
Caveat emptor, man. Caveat emptor.
Addition: Forgot to mention that, on the Palgrave Pivot front, they are obviously trying to blur the distinction between book and article. Or maybe they’re just conceding that most people photocopy/scan individual chapters. Why might I think that? Hmm:
Onnekink Reinterpreting the Dutch Forty Years War 1672-1713 ch1 p1.png
It will be interesting to see if other publishers take up this model.

There’s gotta be a better way

In preparation for a new introductory digital history course that I’ll be teaching in the fall, I’ve been trying to think about how to share my decades of accumulated computer wisdom with my students (says the wise sage, stroking his long white beard). Since my personal experience with computers goes back to the 80s – actually, the late 70s with Oregon Trail on dial-up in the school library – I’m more of a Web 1.0 guy. Other than blogs, I pretty much ignore social media like Facebook and Twitter (not to mention Snapchat, Instagram, Pinterest…), and try to do most of my computer work on a screen larger than 4″. So I guess that makes me a kind of cyber-troglodyte in 2017. But I think that does allow me a much broader perspective of what computers can and can’t do. One thing I have learned to appreciate, for example, is how many incremental workflow improvements are readily available, shortcuts that don’t require writing Python from the terminal line.

As a result, I’ll probably start the course with an overview of the variety of ways computers can help us complete our tasks more quickly and easily, which requires understanding the variety of ways in which we can achieve these efficiencies. After a few minutes of thought (and approval from my “full-stack” computer-programming wife), I came up with this spectrum that suggests the ways in which we can make computers do more of our work for us. Toil, silicon slave, toil!

Computer automation spectrum.png

Automation Spectrum: It’s Only a Model

Undoubtedly others have already expressed this basic idea, but most of the digital humanities/digital history I’ve seen online is much more focused on the extreme right of this spectrum (e.g. the quite useful but slightly intimidating Programming Historian) – this makes sense if you’re trying to distantly read big data across thousands of documents. But I’m not interested in the debate whether ‘real’ digital humanists need to program or not, and in any case I’m focused on undergraduate History majors that often have limited computer skills (mobile apps are just too easy). Therefore I’m happy if I can remind students that there are a large variety of powerful automation features available to people with just a little bit of computer smarts and an Internet connection, things that don’t require learning to speak Javascript or Python fluently. Call it kaizen if you want. The middle of the automation spectrum, in other words.

So I’ll want my students, for example, to think about low-hanging fruit (efficiency fruit?) that they can spend five minutes googling and save themselves hours of mindless labor. As an example, I’m embarrassed to admit that it was only when sketching this spectrum that I realized that I should try to automate one of the most annoying features of my current note-taking system, the need to clean up hundreds of PDFs downloaded from various databases: Google Books, Gale’s newspaper and book databases, etc. If you spend any time downloading early modern primary sources (or scan secondary sources), you know that the standard file format continues to be Adobe Acrobat PDFs. And if you’ve seen the quality of early modern OCR’d text, you know why having the original page images is a good idea.

But you may want, for example, to delete pages from PDFs that include various copyright text – that text will confuse DTPO’s AI and your searches. I’m sure there are more sophisticated ways of doing that, but the spectrum above should prompt you to wonder whether Adobe Acrobat has some kind of script or macro feature that might speed up deleting such pages from 1,000s (literally) of PDF documents that you’ve downloaded over the years. And, lo and behold, Adobe Acrobat does indeed have an automation feature that allows you to carry out the same PDF manipulation again and again. Once you realize “there’s gotta be a better way!”, you only need to figure out what that feature is called in the application in question. For Adobe Acrobat it used to be called batch processing, but in Adobe Acrobat Pro DC such mass manipulations now fall under the Actions moniker. So google ‘Adobe Acrobat Actions’ and you’ll quickly find websites that allow you to download various actions people have created. Which allows you to quickly learn how the feature works, and to modify existing actions. For example, I made this Acrobat Action to add “ps” (primary source) to the Keywords metadata field of every PDF file in the designated folder:

Screenshot 2017-05-10 18.52.17.png

I already copied and tweaked macros and Applescripts that will add Keywords to rich text files in my Devonthink database, but this Adobe solution is ideal after I’ve downloaded hundreds of PDFs from, say, a newspaper database.

Similarly, this next action will delete the last page of every PDF in the designated folder. (I just hardcoded to delete page 4, because I know newspaper X always has 4 pages – I can sort by file size to locate any outliers – and the last page is always the copyright page with the nasty text I want to delete. I can, for example, change the exact page number for each newspaper series, though there’s probably a way to make this a variable that the user can specify with each use):

Screenshot 2017-05-10 18.52.43.png

Computers usually have multiple ways to do any specific task. For us non-programmers, the internet is full of communities of nerds who explain how to automate all sorts of software tasks – forums (fora?) are truly a god-send. But it first requires us to expect more from our computers and our software. For any given software, RTFM (as they say), and then check out the software’s website forum – you’ll be amazed at the stuff you find. Hopefully all that time you save from automation won’t be spent obsessively reading the forum!

End of the semester

Which means I can return to the blog. Why so long without a post? The usual suspects: teaching three courses (note-to-self: teaching a course requiring three new class preps per week for an entire semester gets really old, even if it’s the Enlightenment); revising a think-piece book chapter on what we mean when we use the term “strategy”; revising my chapter on siege capitulations and otherwise editing the other chapters in the World of the Siege collection; thinking about the battle book; assistant chairing and scheduling; designing and overseeing the creation of a Digital History Lab; splitting my Devonthink databases into separate course databases and setting up my Devonthink To Go databases on the iPad/iPhone; downloading a ton of Google Books PDFs; and starting preps for a new Intro to Digital History course this fall.

But motivated by all the digital tips and tricks I’m learning, I’ll try to make more frequent posts for the blog over the summer. That will include posting a few examples of the new digital toys.

So stay tuned…

SMH 2017 Conference

For those attending the Society for Military History conference this year (not me) in Jacksonville, FL on March 30-April 2, you have the following panels to attend:

PANEL 2 B – BOARDROOM 2, 3RD FLOOR

RELIGION, REVOLT AND INDEPENDENCE: UNDERSTANDING WAR IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE

Chair and Commentator:  David J. B. Trim, Andrews University

Forging Alliances:  Reformed Rebels in the Wars of Religion
Dencie Fett, University of North Florida

The Enigma of Hugh O’Neill: Irish Military Strategy and Foreign Intervention in the Nine Years War
Edward Tenace, Lyon College

Intervening from a Position of Weakness: English Intervention Attempts on the Continent During the Personal Rule of Charles I
James A. Tucker, The Ohio State University

At the same time there are two panels on digital military history, if you like that kind of thing.

There’s also a poster in Session 3:

Soldiers and Society after the Seven Years’ War: The Impact of Eighteenth Century Demobilization
Jessica Dirkson, Georgia Southern University.

PANEL 4 A BOARDROOM 1, 3RD FLOOR

18TH AND 19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN WARS ON GLOBAL CONTEXT

Chair:  Gregory J. W. Urwin, Temple University

“Munition Us With Gunpowder, Rope-Matches, and Fuses”: Catholic Clergy and Armed Conflict during the French Wars of Religion
Gregory Bereiter, Naval History and Heritage Command

Flanders to Brazil:  Battlefield Perception in the Portuguese Early Modern Atlantic World
Miguel Cruz, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal

Napoleon’s Empire: A Global View?
John Morgan, Miles College

Commentator: Stanley D. M. Carpenter, U.S. Naval War College

PANEL 5 C – BOARDROOM 3, 3RD FLOOR

EVERYTHING OLD IS NEW AGAIN: HISTORICAL-STATISTICAL STUDIES OF CENTRAL EUROPEAN ARMIES, 1618-1789

Chair and Commentator: Peter H. Wilson, All Souls College, University of Oxford

Most Saxon Soldiers Are Saxon:  The Myth of the Rootless Mercenary and the Origins of Soldiers in Electoral Saxony, 1618-1651
Lucia Staiano-Daniels, University of California, Los Angeles

Social and National Composition of the Habsburg Officer Corps, 1740-1790
Tobias Roeder, Clare College, University of Cambridge

Old-Regime Armies? Modern Armies? The Case of Habsburg Austria, 1740-1792
Ilya Berkovich, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich

One pre-revolutionary paper managed to sneak into another panel, but looking at the chair and commentator, it makes sense:

PANEL 7 F – CLEARWATER, 3RD FLOOR

THE SOLDIER AND THE CIVILIAN IN MILITARY HISTORY AND THEORY: 250 YEARS OF GLOBAL INFLUENCES ON MILITARY THINKING, 1740-1990

Chair:  Patrick Speelman, United States Merchant Marine Academy

Influencing Wellington’s Army:  The Impact of Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Military Thought on the British Army
Huw J. Davies, King’s College London

A Case of Goats Mingling with Sheep?  The Wartime Relationship Between the Civilian Engineering Profession and the British Army 1914-1919
Aimée Fox-Godden, King’s College London

“Operation Military History Singapore”: Theodore Ropp’s Makers of Modern Strategy Revisted and the Parameters of Military History
Michael P. M. Finch, King’s College London

Commentator:  Mark Danley, United States Military Academy

And of course several early American panels (3C, 5A, 7A).

The full program is available here: http://ww2.fsu.edu/smh-conference/conference-program

Here we going again with the skulking

For those who get all their international news from CNN, they would’ve come across this article on the British (“Royal”) Navy keeping a close eye on Russia’s lone aircraft carrier as it chugs its way back to its Baltic home: http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/26/europe/britain-russia-aircraft-carrier/.

The quote receiving attention abroad was the UK Defence Secretary saying that “We are keeping a close eye on the Admiral Kuznetsov as it skulks back to Russia, a ship of shame whose mission has only extended the suffering of the Syrian people.” Of course for me, the money quote was not the “ship of shame” line – to be honest, I had to think for a minute which shame to focus on: the mission, the carrier design, or its operational performance in the Eastern Med? No, I smiled at yet another example of the British accusing their opponents of skulking about – why can’t everybody just be brave and downright like the British?

So, is Vladimir Putin the new Louis XIV? Discuss.

And the printing presses keep on churning

An early year bibliography review, including books soon-to-appear.

Forssberg, Anna Maria. The Story of War: Church and Propaganda in France and Sweden 1610–1710. Lund, Sweden: Nordic Academic Press, 2017.
Abstract: ”O God we thank thee” was sung in the churches of France and Sweden after military victories in the seventeenth century. To celebrate Thanksgiving was a way of thanking God, but also a way for the rulers to legitimize the ever ongoing wars. For the inhabitants it was both an occasion for festivity and a way of getting information about what happened in the battlefield. Yet the image given was selective. Bloody defeats and uneventful everyday life was replaced by spectacular victories and royal glory. Even though the rituals in the two countries were similar in some ways, there were also substantial differences. The propaganda formulated a narrative about what war actually was, and what role the rulers and their subjects should play. In the crisis of 1709 this narrative was profoundly challenged. The book investigates how war events were communicated to the inhabitants of France and Sweden in the seventeenth century by the Church, and especially through days of thanksgiving (called Te Deum in France).
For those who read French, there’s the edited collection Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidental (XVe-XIXe siècles), which includes chapters like:
  • Boltanski, Ariane. “L’encadrement religieux des armées associées à la Ligue (1590-1592).” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 111–28. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Bourdeu, Étienne. “La monarchie, la dynastie ou la religion? Les Espagnols et la Ligue catholique (1618-1619).” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 229–44. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Burkardt, Albrecht. “Mercenaires et Inquisition romaine (XVIe-XVIIIe siècle).” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 209–28. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Chaline, Olivier. “Les clercs et les armes à l’époque moderne: quelques remarques.” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 97–110. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Galland, Caroline. “«Des missions aux armées et aux hospitaux»: les aumôniers récollets sous le règne de Louis XIV.” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 35–50. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Léonard, Julien. “Les pasteurs de Metz face au pouvoir militaire (XVIe-XVIIe siècle): des hommes de Dieu dans une ville de garnison.” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 65–82. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Lepri, Valentina. “Military Strategies Versus ‘Humanae Litterae’. The Rules of Domenico Mora, Chief of the Army in 16th-Century Poland.” In Books for Captains and Captains in Books: Shaping the Perfect Military Commander in Early Modern Europe, edited by Marco Faini and Maria Elena Severini, 65–76. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2016.
  • Masson, Christophe. “Le rôle des ecclésiastiques dans les armées françaises d’Italie à l’époque du Grand Schisme d’Occident (1382-1411).” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 83–96. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Meyer, Frédéric. “L’impossible aumônerie militaire en France sous l’Ancien Régime.” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 51–64. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Muller, Claude. “Dieu et Mars: le clergé alsacien pendant la guerre de Succession d’Espagne (1702-1714).” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 129–44. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Nijenhuis-Bescher, Andreas. “«On a laissé quelques Couvens de Religieuses, mais chassé tous les gens de l’église»: la «Milice» des Provinces-Unies sous Frédéric-Henri d’Orange (1584-1647) bras armé d’un État confessionnel.” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 245–68. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Picaud-Monnerat, Sandrine. “L’armée et l’Église pendant la guerre de Succession d’Autriche: les campagnes de Flandre (1744-1748) vues du côté français.” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 145–62. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Simiz, Stefano. “Prêcher aux militaires: les sermons de l’abbé Demaugre vers 1775.” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 179–90. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Boniface, Xavier. “Conclusion. Armée et religion XVe-XIXe siècle.” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 269–76. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
And how about:
Strickland, Lloyd. “Leibniz’s Egypt Plan (1671–1672): From Holy War to Ecumenism.” Intellectual History Review 26, no. 4 (December 2016): 461–76.

In other words, war, religion and peace are becoming quite the topic, recall the parallel English publication of The European Wars of Religion: An Interdisciplinary Reassessment of Sources, Interpretations, and Myths, edited by Wolfgang Palaver, Dietmar Regensburger, and Harriet Rudolph. Ashgate, 2016. And that’s a good thing.

And since I’ve already cited one French book, I guess I can cite a few more items:

Chaline, Olivier. Les armées du Roi – Le grand chantier XVIIe-XVIIIe siècle: Le grand chantier – XVIIe-XVIIIe siècle. Paris: Armand Colin, 2016.
Denys, Catherine. “The Police and Justice Systems of Soldiers and Burghers in Eighteenth-Century Brussels.” In Militär und Recht vom 16. bis 19. Jahrhundert: Gelehrter Diskurs – Praxis – Transformationen, edited by Jutta Nowosadtko, Kai Lohsträter, and Diethelm Klippel, 1st ed., 171–86. V&R unipress, 2016.
Denys, Catherine. “Les ingénieurs du roi de France auprès de la couronne d’Espagne (1704-1715) / The Engineers of the King of France with the Ear of the Crown of Spain, 1704–1715.” Vegueta: Anuario de la Facultad de Geografía e Historia, no. 16 (2016): 67–92.

And now that I’ve created separate Zotero records for individual chapters, I can include a few from a previous mention:

  • Breccia, Gastone. “Virtus Under Fire. Renaissance Leaders in a Deadlier Battlefield.” In Books for Captains and Captains in Books: Shaping the Perfect Military Commander in Early Modern Europe, edited by Marco Faini and Maria Elena Severini, 21–34. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2016.
  • Faini, Marco. “The Holy Captain: Military Command and Sacredness in the Early-Modern Age.” In Books for Captains and Captains in Books: Shaping the Perfect Military Commander in Early Modern Europe, edited by Marco Faini and Maria Elena Severini, 117–34. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2016.
  • Manfredini, Ilario. “The Image of the ‘Soldier Prince’ in Florence and Turin in the Second Half of the Sixteenth Century.” In Books for Captains and Captains in Books: Shaping the Perfect Military Commander in Early Modern Europe, edited by Marco Faini and Maria Elena Severini, 165–76. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2016.
  • Tranquilli, Vittorio. “The Heroism of Jests in Francesco Andreini’s Le Bravure Del Capitano Spavento.” In Books for Captains and Captains in Books: Shaping the Perfect Military Commander in Early Modern Europe, edited by Marco Faini and Maria Elena Severini, 149–64. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2016.
  • Vesiero, Marco. “‘Risistere Alla Furia De’ Cavagli E Degli Omini D’arme’. A Lost Book for a Condottiere by Leonardo Da Vinci.” In Books for Captains and Captains in Books: Shaping the Perfect Military Commander in Early Modern Europe, edited by Marco Faini and Maria Elena Severini, 103–16. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2016.
And lest we forget how nasty warfare really is:
  • Hall, Dianne. “‘Most Barbarously and Inhumaine Maner Butchered’: Masculinity, Trauma, and Memory in Early Modern Ireland.” In The Body in Pain in Irish Literature and Culture, edited by Fionnuala Dillane, Naomi McAreavey, and Emilie Pine, 39–55. Palgrave Macmillan, 2016.
  • Peters, Erin. “Trauma Narratives of the English Civil War.” Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 16, no. 1 (Winter 2016).
The nastiness goes more than flesh-deep, as is indicated by the forthcoming Kuijpers, Erika, and Cornelis van der Haven, eds. Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination. 1st ed. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017:
  • Bähr, Andreas. “Magical Swords and Heavenly Weapons: Battlefield Fear(lessness) in the Seventeenth Century.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 49–69. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Berkovich, Ilya. “Fear, Honour and Emotional Control on the Eighteenth-Century Battlefield.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 93–110. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • De Boer, Lisa. “The Sidelong Glance: Tracing Battlefield Emotions in Dutch Art of the Golden Age.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 207–27. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Favret, Mary A. “Whose Battlefield Emotion?” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 197–204. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Füssel, Marian. “Emotions in the Making: The Transformation of Battlefield Experiences during the Seven Years’ War (1756–1763).” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 149–72. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Germani, Ian. “Mediated Battlefields of the French Revolution and Emotives at Work.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 173–94. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Haven, Cornelis van der. “Drill and Allocution as Emotional Practices in Seventeenth-Century Dutch Poetry, Plays and Military Treatises.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 25–47. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Kuijpers, Erika, and Cornelis van der Haven. “Battlefield Emotions 1500–1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 3–21. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Mainz, Valerie. “Deflecting the Fire of Eighteenth-Century French Battle Painting.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 229–47. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Noak, Bettina. “Emotions, Imagination and Surgery: Wounded Warriors in the Work of Ambroise Paré and Johan van Beverwijck.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 71–91. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Sandberg, Brian. “‘His Courage Produced More Fear in His Enemies than Shame in His Soldiers’: Siege Combat and Emotional Display in the French Wars of Religion.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 127–48. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Shaw, Philip. “Picturing Valenciennes: Philippe-Jacques de Loutherbourg and the Emotional Regulation of British Military Art in the 1790s.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 249–67. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Sturkenboom, Dorothee. “Battlefield Emotions in Early Modern Europe: Trends, Key Issues and Blind Spots.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 271–83. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Verberckmoes, Johan. “Early Modern Jokes on Fearing Soldiers.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 113–24. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
But let’s give the Spanish Habsburgs their due:
Martínez, Miguel. Front Lines: Soldiers’ Writing in the Early Modern Hispanic World. S.l.: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016.
Abstract: In Front Lines, Miguel Martínez documents the literary practices of imperial Spain’s common soldiers. Against all odds, these Spanish soldiers produced, distributed, and consumed a remarkably innovative set of works on war that have been almost completely neglected in literary and historical scholarship. The soldiers of Italian garrisons and North African presidios, on colonial American frontiers and in the traveling military camps of northern Europe read and wrote epic poems, chronicles, ballads, pamphlets, and autobiographies—the stories of the very same wars in which they participated as rank-and-file fighters and witnesses. The vast network of agents and spaces articulated around the military institutions of an ever-expanding and struggling Spanish empire facilitated the global circulation of these textual materials, creating a soldierly republic of letters that bridged the Old and the many New Worlds of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.Martínez asserts that these writing soldiers played a key role in the shaping of Renaissance literary culture, which for its part gave to them the language and forms with which to question received notions of the social logic of warfare, the ethics of violence, and the legitimacy of imperial aggression. Soldierly writing often voiced criticism of established hierarchies and exploitative working conditions, forging solidarities among the troops that often led to mutiny and massive desertion. It is the perspective of these soldiers that grounds Front Lines, a cultural history of Spain’s imperial wars as told by the common men who fought them.
Mawson, Stephanie J. “Convicts or Conquistadores? Spanish Soldiers in the Seventeenth-Century Pacific.” Past & Present 232, no. 1 (August 1, 2016): 87–125.
Navarro-Loidi, Juan. “Cadet Selection for the Royal Artillery in Spain, 1764–1808.” Vulcan 4, no. 1 (August 1, 2016): 27–51.
Luengo, Pedro. “Military Engineering in Eighteenth-Century Havana and Manila: The Experience of the Seven Years War.” War in History 24, no. 1 (January 1, 2017): 4–27.
And can I get a ‘Hell Yeah!” for the Oirish?
  • O’Neill, James. “A Kingdom near Lost: English Military Recovery in Ireland, 1600-03.” British Journal for Military History 3, no. 1 (November 3, 2016)..
  • O’Neill, James. “Three Sieges and Two Massacres: Enniskillen at the Outbreak of the Nine Years’ War, 1593-5.” Irish Sword 30 (November 1, 2016): 241–49.
[Insert your own British Isles transition here, preferably something about Brexit, because I’ve got bupkis]:
Peters, Kate. “The Quakers and the Politics of the Army in the Crisis of 1659.” Past & Present, May 16, 2016.
And, most surprising of all, I just learned that my very own regional public university has hired someone who actually studies early modern (Spanish) military culture, so her work deserves a shout out as well:
  • Nájera, Luna. “Masculinity, War, and Pursuit of Glory in Sepúlveda’s ‘Gonzalo.’” Hispanic Review 80, no. 3 (2012): 391–412.
  • Nájera, Luna. “The Deployment of the Classics in Early Modern Spanish Military Manuals.” Sixteenth Century Journal 46, no. 3 (Fall 2015): 607–27.

Phew, I’m tired. I better go have a lay-down.

No wonder we historians are bad at math – they keep changing the answers

Apropos an old thread on naming wars based off their duration (and how complicated that really is), this story appeared recently on my History News Network feed. It’s neither early modern nor European, but it’s been a busy six months.

file-jan-13-9-59-00-pm

Story from the New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/11/world/asia/china-japan-textbooks-war.html?_r=0

Professor: “How long was the Eight-Year War of Resistance against Japanese Aggression”?
Student: “Eight years.”
Professor: “Wrong. Fourteen.”

My main thought: while it’s nice that there’s an official name for wars, just imagine the need to change all those references and Library of Congress subject headings. Ugh.