Maps of Spanish Succession fortresses in Flanders

As you all know, you can search for images of EMEMH items in Google’s Image search. Another resource for images is (once again) available – a selection of maps from the 19C Vault and Pelet series Mémoires militaires, relating to the War of the Spanish Succession. Eons ago in grad school on one of my trips up to the University of Michigan libraries the staff there were kind enough to scan in a number of these huge maps from the Atlas in the series. For awhile they had them up online, then they seemed to disappear. But as I am preparing to update my old website, I just noticed that they are back. Go to the Miscellaneous collection search page here and search under “ostwald” to find two dozen detailed scans of fortresses and sieges from the war (in the Low Countries). These are 19C maps, and I’m not sure how exactly these plans were made (other than by France’s Dépôt de la Guerre), but they seem relatively accurate from what I can tell.

A sample (detail from the larger map):

Detail from map of Rheinberg in Mémoires militaires

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4 responses to “Maps of Spanish Succession fortresses in Flanders”

  1. Erik Lund says :

    That’s so awesome. The atlas volume of de Vault and Pelet is honestly one of the triumphs of nineteenth century historical science, along with Feldzuege des Prinzen Eugens. The whole thing needs to be digitised, especially the length-of-the-river map series of the Rhine. But this is a great start. Thanks, Jamal!

    • Elizabeth Mindel Ostwald says :

      I remember Jamel and I photocopying that map of the Rhine (it took many pages). We also did the one of the Low Countries, which we then attempted to attach back together into one giant map (not as easy as it sounds). We still have the laminated version around here somewhere.

  2. Sheldon Clare says :

    If you like old maps, here is a terrific resource. It even allows to to enlarge and excerpt map sections: http://portal.digmap.eu/index/index.html

    • jostwald says :

      Great resource. Unfortunately, it looks like the Belgian state library has broken its links, but I hope the images are still on their website somewhere.
      Thanks.

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