Fall 2015

Busy with many things (thank God for Pocket Informant and GTD), including teaching the Crusades for the first time.

The biggest lesson I’ve learned thus far? If I ever become dictator, my first edict will be to ban the names Raymond and Baldwin. Deus vult!

So some graphical filler while I struggle through the rest of the semester:

Because historians always start their courses long before their courses begin

Because historians always start their courses long before their courses begin. And no, I won’t tell you how long it took me to make this damn timechart.

Next, a timeline with far too much detail (inevitable in a first draft):

Crusader states, 1144-1192

Crusader states, 1144-1192. Note that I’ve started indicating the relationship between a new monarch and the previous one.

I still need to figure out how to visualize causal chains – suggestions, as well as any factual corrections, are welcome.

And on a more general pedagogical note: it’s amazing how much easier (NB: not “easy”) it is to prep for a course in a totally new field if you have four different historical atlases that you can rely upon for detailed maps and chronologies. I only wish EME history had a similar selection.

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2 responses to “Fall 2015”

  1. Ben Trotter says :

    I find that creating such graphics – time consuming as it may be – is as much a tool for bringing organization and clarity to my understanding of a topic as it is an aid to my students’ understanding. In fact, prior to a slimming-down revision, it is more of the former than the latter.

    • jostwald says :

      Indeed. In fact, I tried to replicate that (probably not too successfully) by having the students in small groups create their own timeline, which was followed by a general discussion of what types of events and details merit being included in a timeline.

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