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The Flood continues

Anybody else notice the explosion in edited collections over the past X number of years? I assume it has to something to do with the publishing market, but I wouldn’t be surprised if changes in academia, namely the recent incentivization of frequent publishing in English higher ed, as well as various EU government funding streams, have encouraged lots of European scholars to host conferences and publish the results. But what do I know.

And by way of segue (note, not Segway), how about some recent publications in an EMEMH vein? How about if I put them in no particular order and provide almost no additional commentary?

Tracy, James D. Balkan Wars: Habsburg Croatia, Ottoman Bosnia, and Venetian Dalmatia, 1499–1617. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2016.

Davies, Brian L. The Russo-Turkish War, 1768-1774: Catherine II and the Ottoman Empire. London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2016.
Brittan, Owen. “Subjective Experience and Military Masculinity at the Beginning of the Long Eighteenth Century, 1688-1714.” Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 40, no. 2 (June 1, 2017): 273–90.
El Hage, Fadi. Vendôme : La gloire ou l’imposture. Paris: BELIN, 2016.
Close, Christopher W. “City-States, Princely States, and Warfare: Corporate Alliance and State Formation in the Holy Roman Empire (1540–1610).” European History Quarterly 47, no. 2 (April 1, 2017): 205–28.
Black, Jeremy. Plotting Power: Strategy in the Eighteenth Century. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2017.
Murdoch, Steve, Alexia Nora Lina Grosjean, and Siobhan Marie Talbott. “Drummer Major James Spens: Letters from a Common Soldier Abroad, 1617-1632.” Northern Studies 47 (December 2015): 76–101.
McCluskey, Phil. “ ‘Enemies of Their Patrie’: Savoyard Identity and the Dilemmas of War, 1690-1713.” In Performances of Peace: Utrecht 1713, 69–91. Leiden: Brill, 2015.
Probably the most military-themed of the dozen chapters, based off a conference of the same name.
Berkovich, Ilya. Motivation in War: The Experience of Common Soldiers in Old-Regime Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017.
James, Alan. “Rethinking the Peace of Westphalia: Toward a Theory of Early-Modern Warfare.” In Aspects of Violence in Renaissance Europe, edited by Jonathan Davies. Ashgate Publishing, 2013.
Woodcock, Matthew. “Tudor Soldier-Authors and the Art of Military Autobiography.” In Representing War and Violence, 1250-1600, edited by Joanna Bellis and Laura Slater. Boydell Press, 2016.
Several other chapters in the collection deal with medieval warfare also.
Steen, Jasper Van der. Memory Wars in the Low Countries, 1566-1700. Leiden; Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, 2015.
Fulton, Robert. “Crafting a Site of State Information Management: The French Case of the Dépôt de La Guerre.” French Historical Studies 40, no. 2 (April 1, 2017): 215–40.
Manning, Roger. War and Peace in the Western Political Imagination: From Classical Antiquity to the Age of Reason. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2016.
Abel, Jonathan. Guibert: Father of Napoleon’s Grande Armée. University of Oklahoma Press, 2016.
Van der Linden, David. “Memorializing the Wars of Religion in Early Seventeenth-Century French Picture Galleries.” Renaissance Quarterly 70, no. 1 (2017): 132–78.
Asbach, Olaf, and Peter Schröder, eds. The Ashgate Research Companion to the Thirty Years’ War. Farnham, Surrey, England ; Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing, 2014.

Blakemore, Richard J., and Elaine Murphy. The British Civil Wars at Sea, 1638-1653. Boydell Press, 2017.

Linnarsson, Magnus. “Unfaithful and Expensive – but Absolutely Necessary: Perceptions of Mercenaries in Swedish War Policy, 1621–1636.” Revue d’Histoire nordique 18 (2015): 51–73.
Tolley, Stewart. “In Praise of General Stanhope: Reputation, Public Opinion and the Battle of Almenar, 1710-1733.” British Journal for Military History 3 (2017): 1–21.
Vo-Ha, Paul. Rendre les armes – Le sort des vaincus XVI-XVIIe siècles. Champ Vallon, 2017.
Forssberg, Anna Maria. “The Information State: War and Communication in Sweden during the 17th Century.” In (Re-)Contextualizing Literary and Cultural History, n.d.
Murphy, Neil. “Violence, Colonization and Henry VIII’s Conquest of France, 1544–1546.” Past & Present 233, no. 1 (November 1, 2016): 13–51.
Langley, Chris R. “Caring for Soldiers, Veterans and Families in Scotland, 1638–1651.” History 102, no. 349 (January 1, 2017): 5–23.
Ede-Borrett, Stephen. The Army of James II, 1685-1688: The Birth of the British Army. Helion and Company, 2017.
Sherer, Idan. Warriors for a Living: The Experience of the Spanish Infantry during the Italian Wars, 1494-1559. Brill Academic Publishers, 2017.
Houston, Amy. “The Faithful City Defended and Delivered: Cultural Narratives of Siege Warfare in France, 1553-1591.” Archiv Für Reformationsgeschichte/Archive for Reformation History 107, no. 1 (October 2016).
Paton, Kevin, and Martin Cook. “The 1560 Fortifications and Siege of Leith: Archaeological Evidence for a New Transcription of the Cartographic Evidence.” Post-Medieval Archaeology 50, no. 2 (May 3, 2016): 264–78.
And then we come to the editorial commentary.
Jacob, Frank, and Gilmar Visoni-Alonzo. The Military Revolution in Early Modern Europe: A Revision. London: Palgrave Pivot, 2016.
Sounds intriguing yes? I thought so too. So I bought it – $55 for hardcover isn’t too bad, I thought to myself. But what I failed to do, unfortunately, is to look closely at the page length. To save you the trouble, here’s a comparison of a few “randomly-chosen” books:
Pivot Photo.jpeg
Yep, I just spent $55 plus tax for a measly 101 pages (88 of actual text). The importance of an imprint.
For comparison, feel free to reread my earlier thoughts on EMEMH publishing, which seemed to be going in the opposite direction of costlier and deeper: here and here. It may just be me, but I’m not sure I like the direction of this Pivot.
We could apply the Ostwald Test: Historiography for Dummies, but I’m not sure what the pages-to-coverage ratio would be for a book that ranges from the Classical world to World War II, from Tenochtitlan to Mysore to Korea, and from Alexander the Great to Leopold III of Austria to Koxinga. All in 101 pages. Onnekink’s Reinterpreting the Dutch Forty Years War is a bit longer and more focused ($55 for 138 pages), but it’s the principle of the thing: I’d rather spend $100 for a 300-page book that delves into a subject I’m interested in.
Caveat emptor, man. Caveat emptor.
Addition: Forgot to mention that, on the Palgrave Pivot front, they are obviously trying to blur the distinction between book and article. Or maybe they’re just conceding that most people photocopy/scan individual chapters. Why might I think that? Hmm:
Onnekink Reinterpreting the Dutch Forty Years War 1672-1713 ch1 p1.png
It will be interesting to see if other publishers take up this model.
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And the printing presses keep on churning

An early year bibliography review, including books soon-to-appear.

Forssberg, Anna Maria. The Story of War: Church and Propaganda in France and Sweden 1610–1710. Lund, Sweden: Nordic Academic Press, 2017.
Abstract: ”O God we thank thee” was sung in the churches of France and Sweden after military victories in the seventeenth century. To celebrate Thanksgiving was a way of thanking God, but also a way for the rulers to legitimize the ever ongoing wars. For the inhabitants it was both an occasion for festivity and a way of getting information about what happened in the battlefield. Yet the image given was selective. Bloody defeats and uneventful everyday life was replaced by spectacular victories and royal glory. Even though the rituals in the two countries were similar in some ways, there were also substantial differences. The propaganda formulated a narrative about what war actually was, and what role the rulers and their subjects should play. In the crisis of 1709 this narrative was profoundly challenged. The book investigates how war events were communicated to the inhabitants of France and Sweden in the seventeenth century by the Church, and especially through days of thanksgiving (called Te Deum in France).
For those who read French, there’s the edited collection Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidental (XVe-XIXe siècles), which includes chapters like:
  • Boltanski, Ariane. “L’encadrement religieux des armées associées à la Ligue (1590-1592).” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 111–28. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Bourdeu, Étienne. “La monarchie, la dynastie ou la religion? Les Espagnols et la Ligue catholique (1618-1619).” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 229–44. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Burkardt, Albrecht. “Mercenaires et Inquisition romaine (XVIe-XVIIIe siècle).” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 209–28. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Chaline, Olivier. “Les clercs et les armes à l’époque moderne: quelques remarques.” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 97–110. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Galland, Caroline. “«Des missions aux armées et aux hospitaux»: les aumôniers récollets sous le règne de Louis XIV.” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 35–50. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Léonard, Julien. “Les pasteurs de Metz face au pouvoir militaire (XVIe-XVIIe siècle): des hommes de Dieu dans une ville de garnison.” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 65–82. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Lepri, Valentina. “Military Strategies Versus ‘Humanae Litterae’. The Rules of Domenico Mora, Chief of the Army in 16th-Century Poland.” In Books for Captains and Captains in Books: Shaping the Perfect Military Commander in Early Modern Europe, edited by Marco Faini and Maria Elena Severini, 65–76. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2016.
  • Masson, Christophe. “Le rôle des ecclésiastiques dans les armées françaises d’Italie à l’époque du Grand Schisme d’Occident (1382-1411).” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 83–96. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Meyer, Frédéric. “L’impossible aumônerie militaire en France sous l’Ancien Régime.” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 51–64. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Muller, Claude. “Dieu et Mars: le clergé alsacien pendant la guerre de Succession d’Espagne (1702-1714).” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 129–44. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Nijenhuis-Bescher, Andreas. “«On a laissé quelques Couvens de Religieuses, mais chassé tous les gens de l’église»: la «Milice» des Provinces-Unies sous Frédéric-Henri d’Orange (1584-1647) bras armé d’un État confessionnel.” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 245–68. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Picaud-Monnerat, Sandrine. “L’armée et l’Église pendant la guerre de Succession d’Autriche: les campagnes de Flandre (1744-1748) vues du côté français.” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 145–62. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Simiz, Stefano. “Prêcher aux militaires: les sermons de l’abbé Demaugre vers 1775.” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 179–90. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
  • Boniface, Xavier. “Conclusion. Armée et religion XVe-XIXe siècle.” In Le soldat face au clerc. Armée et religion en Europe occidentale (XVe-XIXe siècle), edited by Laurent Jalabert and Stefano Simiz, 269–76. Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2016.
And how about:
Strickland, Lloyd. “Leibniz’s Egypt Plan (1671–1672): From Holy War to Ecumenism.” Intellectual History Review 26, no. 4 (December 2016): 461–76.

In other words, war, religion and peace are becoming quite the topic, recall the parallel English publication of The European Wars of Religion: An Interdisciplinary Reassessment of Sources, Interpretations, and Myths, edited by Wolfgang Palaver, Dietmar Regensburger, and Harriet Rudolph. Ashgate, 2016. And that’s a good thing.

And since I’ve already cited one French book, I guess I can cite a few more items:

Chaline, Olivier. Les armées du Roi – Le grand chantier XVIIe-XVIIIe siècle: Le grand chantier – XVIIe-XVIIIe siècle. Paris: Armand Colin, 2016.
Denys, Catherine. “The Police and Justice Systems of Soldiers and Burghers in Eighteenth-Century Brussels.” In Militär und Recht vom 16. bis 19. Jahrhundert: Gelehrter Diskurs – Praxis – Transformationen, edited by Jutta Nowosadtko, Kai Lohsträter, and Diethelm Klippel, 1st ed., 171–86. V&R unipress, 2016.
Denys, Catherine. “Les ingénieurs du roi de France auprès de la couronne d’Espagne (1704-1715) / The Engineers of the King of France with the Ear of the Crown of Spain, 1704–1715.” Vegueta: Anuario de la Facultad de Geografía e Historia, no. 16 (2016): 67–92.

And now that I’ve created separate Zotero records for individual chapters, I can include a few from a previous mention:

  • Breccia, Gastone. “Virtus Under Fire. Renaissance Leaders in a Deadlier Battlefield.” In Books for Captains and Captains in Books: Shaping the Perfect Military Commander in Early Modern Europe, edited by Marco Faini and Maria Elena Severini, 21–34. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2016.
  • Faini, Marco. “The Holy Captain: Military Command and Sacredness in the Early-Modern Age.” In Books for Captains and Captains in Books: Shaping the Perfect Military Commander in Early Modern Europe, edited by Marco Faini and Maria Elena Severini, 117–34. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2016.
  • Manfredini, Ilario. “The Image of the ‘Soldier Prince’ in Florence and Turin in the Second Half of the Sixteenth Century.” In Books for Captains and Captains in Books: Shaping the Perfect Military Commander in Early Modern Europe, edited by Marco Faini and Maria Elena Severini, 165–76. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2016.
  • Tranquilli, Vittorio. “The Heroism of Jests in Francesco Andreini’s Le Bravure Del Capitano Spavento.” In Books for Captains and Captains in Books: Shaping the Perfect Military Commander in Early Modern Europe, edited by Marco Faini and Maria Elena Severini, 149–64. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2016.
  • Vesiero, Marco. “‘Risistere Alla Furia De’ Cavagli E Degli Omini D’arme’. A Lost Book for a Condottiere by Leonardo Da Vinci.” In Books for Captains and Captains in Books: Shaping the Perfect Military Commander in Early Modern Europe, edited by Marco Faini and Maria Elena Severini, 103–16. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2016.
And lest we forget how nasty warfare really is:
  • Hall, Dianne. “‘Most Barbarously and Inhumaine Maner Butchered’: Masculinity, Trauma, and Memory in Early Modern Ireland.” In The Body in Pain in Irish Literature and Culture, edited by Fionnuala Dillane, Naomi McAreavey, and Emilie Pine, 39–55. Palgrave Macmillan, 2016.
  • Peters, Erin. “Trauma Narratives of the English Civil War.” Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 16, no. 1 (Winter 2016).
The nastiness goes more than flesh-deep, as is indicated by the forthcoming Kuijpers, Erika, and Cornelis van der Haven, eds. Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination. 1st ed. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017:
  • Bähr, Andreas. “Magical Swords and Heavenly Weapons: Battlefield Fear(lessness) in the Seventeenth Century.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 49–69. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Berkovich, Ilya. “Fear, Honour and Emotional Control on the Eighteenth-Century Battlefield.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 93–110. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • De Boer, Lisa. “The Sidelong Glance: Tracing Battlefield Emotions in Dutch Art of the Golden Age.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 207–27. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Favret, Mary A. “Whose Battlefield Emotion?” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 197–204. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Füssel, Marian. “Emotions in the Making: The Transformation of Battlefield Experiences during the Seven Years’ War (1756–1763).” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 149–72. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Germani, Ian. “Mediated Battlefields of the French Revolution and Emotives at Work.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 173–94. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Haven, Cornelis van der. “Drill and Allocution as Emotional Practices in Seventeenth-Century Dutch Poetry, Plays and Military Treatises.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 25–47. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Kuijpers, Erika, and Cornelis van der Haven. “Battlefield Emotions 1500–1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 3–21. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Mainz, Valerie. “Deflecting the Fire of Eighteenth-Century French Battle Painting.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 229–47. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Noak, Bettina. “Emotions, Imagination and Surgery: Wounded Warriors in the Work of Ambroise Paré and Johan van Beverwijck.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 71–91. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Sandberg, Brian. “‘His Courage Produced More Fear in His Enemies than Shame in His Soldiers’: Siege Combat and Emotional Display in the French Wars of Religion.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 127–48. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Shaw, Philip. “Picturing Valenciennes: Philippe-Jacques de Loutherbourg and the Emotional Regulation of British Military Art in the 1790s.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 249–67. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Sturkenboom, Dorothee. “Battlefield Emotions in Early Modern Europe: Trends, Key Issues and Blind Spots.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 271–83. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
  • Verberckmoes, Johan. “Early Modern Jokes on Fearing Soldiers.” In Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, 113–24. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.
But let’s give the Spanish Habsburgs their due:
Martínez, Miguel. Front Lines: Soldiers’ Writing in the Early Modern Hispanic World. S.l.: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016.
Abstract: In Front Lines, Miguel Martínez documents the literary practices of imperial Spain’s common soldiers. Against all odds, these Spanish soldiers produced, distributed, and consumed a remarkably innovative set of works on war that have been almost completely neglected in literary and historical scholarship. The soldiers of Italian garrisons and North African presidios, on colonial American frontiers and in the traveling military camps of northern Europe read and wrote epic poems, chronicles, ballads, pamphlets, and autobiographies—the stories of the very same wars in which they participated as rank-and-file fighters and witnesses. The vast network of agents and spaces articulated around the military institutions of an ever-expanding and struggling Spanish empire facilitated the global circulation of these textual materials, creating a soldierly republic of letters that bridged the Old and the many New Worlds of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.Martínez asserts that these writing soldiers played a key role in the shaping of Renaissance literary culture, which for its part gave to them the language and forms with which to question received notions of the social logic of warfare, the ethics of violence, and the legitimacy of imperial aggression. Soldierly writing often voiced criticism of established hierarchies and exploitative working conditions, forging solidarities among the troops that often led to mutiny and massive desertion. It is the perspective of these soldiers that grounds Front Lines, a cultural history of Spain’s imperial wars as told by the common men who fought them.
Mawson, Stephanie J. “Convicts or Conquistadores? Spanish Soldiers in the Seventeenth-Century Pacific.” Past & Present 232, no. 1 (August 1, 2016): 87–125.
Navarro-Loidi, Juan. “Cadet Selection for the Royal Artillery in Spain, 1764–1808.” Vulcan 4, no. 1 (August 1, 2016): 27–51.
Luengo, Pedro. “Military Engineering in Eighteenth-Century Havana and Manila: The Experience of the Seven Years War.” War in History 24, no. 1 (January 1, 2017): 4–27.
And can I get a ‘Hell Yeah!” for the Oirish?
  • O’Neill, James. “A Kingdom near Lost: English Military Recovery in Ireland, 1600-03.” British Journal for Military History 3, no. 1 (November 3, 2016)..
  • O’Neill, James. “Three Sieges and Two Massacres: Enniskillen at the Outbreak of the Nine Years’ War, 1593-5.” Irish Sword 30 (November 1, 2016): 241–49.
[Insert your own British Isles transition here, preferably something about Brexit, because I’ve got bupkis]:
Peters, Kate. “The Quakers and the Politics of the Army in the Crisis of 1659.” Past & Present, May 16, 2016.
And, most surprising of all, I just learned that my very own regional public university has hired someone who actually studies early modern (Spanish) military culture, so her work deserves a shout out as well:
  • Nájera, Luna. “Masculinity, War, and Pursuit of Glory in Sepúlveda’s ‘Gonzalo.’” Hispanic Review 80, no. 3 (2012): 391–412.
  • Nájera, Luna. “The Deployment of the Classics in Early Modern Spanish Military Manuals.” Sixteenth Century Journal 46, no. 3 (Fall 2015): 607–27.

Phew, I’m tired. I better go have a lay-down.

Catch up, Fall 2016 edition

Finished revisions for “More Honored in the Breach?” siege capitulation chapter? Check.

Edited more chapters in World of the Siege collection? Check.

Read through (half of) Gillian Rose’s Visual Methodologies (4th ed.) and converted her Critical Visual Methodology circle (p. 25) into a matrix generalized for textual sources? Check.

screenshot-2016-09-16-10-04-57

Viewed the Watteau’s Soldiers exhibit at the Frick in NYC? Check.
A video of the curator’s analysis of the works here. Think interiority and Watteau’s refusal/inability to make his figures interact with each other. Or, you can read it:
Wile, Aaron. Watteau’s Soldiers: Scenes of Military Life in Eighteenth-Century France. New York: GILES, 2016.
Related talks here.

Completed last hoop of West Point History of Warfare iBook chapter, wearing navy slacks and blazer with matching slippers in video intro? Check.

Taught first three weeks of French Revolution and Napoleon (and Western Civ, part deux)? Check.

Purchased Amazon Echo and dove back into Spotify? Check.

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Set up Historical playlists in Spotify to play on web player in class? Check.
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Downloaded 194 articles and book chapters from Academic Search Premier and the new Books at JSTOR? Check.

Entered bibliographic info on new(ish) publications? Check.

  • Ansani, Fabrizio. “Craftsmen, Artillery, and War Production in Renaissance Florence.” Vulcan 4, no. 1 (August 1, 2016): 1–26.
    Navarro-Loidi, Juan. “Cadet Selection for the Royal Artillery in Spain, 1764–1808.” Vulcan 4, no. 1 (August 1, 2016): 27–51.
  • Guidi, Andrea. “‘Per Peli E per Segni’. Muster Rolls, Lists and Annotations: Practical Military Records Relating to the Last Florentine Ordinances and Militia, from Machiavelli to the Fall of the Republic (1506-1530).” Historical Research 89, no. 245 (August 2016).
  • Heuer, Jennifer Ngaire. “Celibacy, Courage, and Hungry Wives: Debating Military Marriage and Citizenship in Pre-Revolutionary France.” European History Quarterly 46, no. 4 (October 1, 2016): 647–67.
  • Way, Peter. “Militarizing the Atlantic World: Army Discipline, Coerced Labor, and Britain’s Commercial Empire.” Atlantic Studies 13, no. 3 (July 2, 2016): 345–69.
  • Schwoerer, Lois G. Gun Culture in Early Modern England. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2016.
  • Canning, Ruth A. “James Fitzpiers Fitzgerald, Captain Thomas Lee, and the Problem of ‘secret Traitors’: Conflicted Loyalties during the Nine Years’ War, 1594-1603.” Irish Historical Studies 39, no. 156 (November 2015): 573–94.
  • Aure, Andreas Harald. The Right to Wage War (Jus Ad Bellum): The German Reception of Grotius 50 Years after De Iure Belli Ac Pacis. BWV Verlag, 2015.
  • Persson, Mathias. “Mediating the Enemy: Prussian Representations of Austria, France and Sweden during the Seven Years War.” German History 32, no. 2 (June 1, 2014): 181–200.
  • Bruyn, Frans de, and Shaun Regan, eds. The Culture of the Seven Years’ War: Empire, Identity, and the Arts in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World. Toronto, Ontario: University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division, 2014.

Set up keyword alerts in JSTOR and Academic Search Premier? Check.

Read general works on military strategy in history, even including some modern U.S. army/navy/air force publications, and scanned some of the more useful into PDFs using ScannX? Check.

But with the page image previewed on the screen

But with the page image previewed on the screen

Finished drafting paper on the levels of war and strategy for the John F. Guilmartin, Jr. conference next week? Not yet.

Agreed to be the university’s club advisor for Dagorhir Battle Games, where young men (not middle-aged professors) beat each other with foam clubs? That’s what you get for teaching military history, I guess.

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Late Summer Reading

As usual, us academics are in frantic end-of-summer research clean-up mode. So in the meantime I’ll mention some recent(ish) works of EMEMH interest.

First up, the latest Journal of Military History has two articles of note:

Tzoref-Ashkenazi, Chen. “German Military Participation in Early Modern European Colonialism.” Journal of Military History 80, no. 3 (July 2016): 671–95.
Abstract: The article examines the military participation of Germans in early modern colonialism, focusing on their service to colonial trading companies and colonial powers. It shows that the German colonial empire had a long pre-history, since German mercenaries provided a vital “tool of empire” for European colonial powers. The article argues that the extensive participation of German soldiers in early modern colonialism demonstrates a hybridity in European colonialism in that national colonial empires relied on trans-national European human resources in addition to local manpower. The article examines German soldiers’ identification with their colonial employers and shows that soldiers recruited as a group retained a stronger sense of separate identity.

Rommelse, Gijs, and Roger Downing. “Victims of an Ideological Rift? Dutch Prisoners of War during the First Anglo-Dutch War (1652–1654).” Journal of Military History 80, no. 3 (July 2016): 649–69.
Abstract: Dutch prisoners from the sea battles of the First Anglo-Dutch War of 1652–1654 were held in England under generally inhumane conditions. It has recently become accepted that ideological differences, as much as commercial, led to the deterioration in relations that led to the conflict. English public opinion had been inflamed by a vicious anti-Dutch propaganda campaign, suggesting that ideological demonization could provide the explanation for the dire treatment to which the prisoners were subjected. It is concluded, however, that logistical problems associated with their reception, plus the chronic lack of money of Cromwell’s regime, provide a sufficient explanation.

For my money, if you ever needed a single diagnostic test to whether a scholar qualifies as a “traditional” military historian, check to see whether their preferred explanatory variable is military, e.g. technical or logistical or tactical constraints, rather than cultural or social. A non-traditional military historian? They’re the ones who use terms like “hybridity”!

And then from a new collection on early modern primary sources:
Younger, Neil. “Warfare.” In Understanding Early Modern Primary Sources, edited by Laura Sangha and Jonathan Willis. Routledge, 2016.

And did I mention that Brian Sandberg’s new book is out?

Sandberg, Brian. War and Conflict in the Early Modern World: 1500-1700. Malden, MA: Polity, 2016.
Abstract: In this latest addition to the War & Conflict Through the Ages series, Brian Sandberg offers a truly global examination of the intersections between war, culture, and society in the early modern period. He traces the innovative military technologies and practices that emerged around 1500, exploring the different forms of warfare including dynastic war, religious warfare, raiding warfare, and peasant revolt  that shaped conflicts during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. He explains how significant social, economic, and political developments transformed warfare on land and at sea at a time of global imperialism and growing mercantilism, forcing states and military systems to respond to rapidly changing situations.  Engaging and insightful, War and Conflict in the Early Modern World will appeal to scholars and students of world history, the early modern period, and those interested in the broader relationship between war and society.

Nuff said.

Early Summer Reading

In case you need to add anything to your summer reading list, the following (recent and not-so-recent) publications are available for your perusal*:

Hamilton, Douglas J., and Douglas Macinnes, eds. Jacobitism, Enlightenment and Empire, 1680-1820. London: Routledge, 2014.
Abstract: The essays in this collection examine religion, politics and commerce in Scotland during a time of crisis and turmoil. Contributors look at the effect of the Union on Scottish trade and commerce, the Scottish role in tobacco and sugar plantations, Robert Burns’s early poetry on his planned emigration to Jamaica and Scottish anti-abolitionists.
Chapters of a more military bent include:
  • McInally, Thomas. “Missionaries or Soldiers for the Jacobite Cause? The Conflict of Loyalties for Scottish Catholic Clergy.” In Jacobitism, Enlightenment and Empire, 1680-1820, edited by Douglas Macinnes and Douglas J. Hamilton, 43–58. London: Routledge, 2014.
  • Szechi, Daniel. “Jamie the Soldier and the Jacobite Military Threat, 1706-27.” In Jacobitism, Enlightenment and Empire, 1680-1820, edited by Douglas Macinnes and Douglas J. Hamilton, 13–28. London: Routledge, 2014.
Faini, Marco, and Maria Elena Severini, eds. Books for Captains and Captains in Books: Shaping the Perfect Military Commander in Early Modern Europe. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2016.
Abstract: This volume collects the papers presented at the conference Books for Captains and Captains in books. Italo-German Conference on the training and image of the military leader during the Renaissance, held at the Herzog August Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel from 24th to 25th February, 2014.
The essays explore at length why and how the captain became the subject of a series of new discourses. The present volume therefore proves an extensive insight into an understudied, if not neglected, subject. It investigates the rise of the captain in early modern Europe through a wide variety of sources: treatises, poems, books of precepts, translations from the classics, and visual sources. While the focus of this collection is mainly on Italy, the articles here collected stress the relevance of cultural transfer to and from Germany, while taking into account also other countries, such as France, Poland and Spain. The interdisciplinary approach allows the successful reconstruction of the figure of the captain, in order to understand the reasons of its rise, and to explain its multifarious representations. This collection of studies also enables us to investigate some of the most crucial historiographical questions concerning early modern Europe (i.e. the role of the Counter Reformation or the issue of social mobility) from new perspectives. Books for Captains and Captains in Books will certainly pave the way for future research into this fascinating and complex topic.
El Hage, Fadi. Abraham Fabert. Du clientélisme au maréchalat (1599-1662). L’Harmattan, 2016.
Abstract: « Cet homme eut un courage intrépide, une application infatigable, une conduite irrépréhensible, et une capacité si diversifiée, qu’on n’a jamais bien su le plus beau de ses talents. » Telle était selon Courtilz de Sandras la réputation d’Abraham Fabert (1599-1662), fils d’imprimeur devenu maréchal de France. Ce livre propose de découvrir ou de redécouvrir un personnage emblématique de l’évolution sociale et militaire de la noblesse au XVIIe siècle, passant du clientélisme auprès de grands seigneurs au service de l’État.

 

Fontaine, Marie-Madeleine, and Jean-Louis Fournel, eds. Les mots de la guerre dans l’Europe de la Renaissance. Genève: Librairie Droz, 2015.
Abstract: Cet ouvrage s’intéresse à la terminologie des mots appartenant aux domaines militaires (armes, artillerie, fortifications, etc.), qu’ils concernent les professionnels de la guerre, les juristes du droit de la guerre ou les acteurs politiques, selon les langues et les conditions de chaque pays du monde européen et méditerranéen, entre les XVe et XVIIe siècles. L’analyse de l’invention, de l’usage et de l’usure des mots réserve quelques surprises dans les évolutions rapides et irrégulières qui marquent les relations entre des réalités éphémères et leurs désignations plus ou moins stables et pertinentes. Les auteurs de ces études se sont interrogés sur les causes diverses qui ont pu être à l’origine de tels décalages ou survivances.
To mention but one example, Pieter Martens has a chapter on the assimilation of Italian engineering terminology in the Habsburg Low Countries.
Tozzi, Christopher J. Nationalizing France’s Army: Foreign, Black, and Jewish Troops in the French Military, 1715-1831. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2016.
Abstract: Before the French Revolution, tens of thousands of foreigners served in France’s army. They included troops from not only all parts of Europe but also places as far away as Madagascar, West Africa, and New York City. Beginning in 1789, the French revolutionaries, driven by a new political ideology that placed “the nation” at the center of sovereignty, began aggressively purging the army of men they did not consider French, even if those troops supported the new regime. Such efforts proved much more difficult than the revolutionaries anticipated, however, owing to both their need for soldiers as France waged war against much of the rest of Europe and the difficulty of defining nationality cleanly at the dawn of the modern era. Napoleon later faced the same conundrums as he vacillated between policies favoring and rejecting foreigners from his army. It was not until the Bourbon Restoration, when the modern French Foreign Legion appeared, that the French state established an enduring policy on the place of foreigners within its armed forces. By telling the story of France’s noncitizen soldiers―who included men born abroad as well as Jews and blacks whose citizenship rights were subject to contestation―Christopher Tozzi sheds new light on the roots of revolutionary France’s inability to integrate its national community despite the inclusionary promise of French republicanism. Drawing on a range of original, unpublished archival sources, Tozzi also highlights the linguistic, religious, cultural, and racial differences that France’s experiments with noncitizen soldiers introduced to eighteenth- and nineteenth-century French society.Winner of the Walker Cowen Memorial Prize for an Outstanding Work of Scholarship in Eighteenth-Century Studies
Dorrell, Nick. Marlborough’s Other Army: The British Army and the Campaigns of the First Peninsula War, 1702-1712. Helion and Company, 2015.
Abstract: An often neglected aspect of Marlborough’s war is its crucial campaign in Spain and Portugal also known as the First Peninsula War of 1702–1712. Whilst this campaign was critical to the outcome of the war, relatively little information is available about it or the army that fought it. This work not only provides  a detailed look  at the army that fought the Spanish and Portuguese campaigns of Marlborough’s war, but it also offers an insight into  the course of the war in Iberia. It aims to provide more detail and understanding of a relatively little known part of a war that helped to shape and strengthened Britain’s position amongst the main European players.  Several chapters look at the national contingents that made up the confederate armies fighting in Spain and Portugal. The work concentrates not only on the reasonably well known British contribution but also on the equally important role of the  less well known Austrian, Dutch, Palatine, Portuguese and Spanish contingents. These chapters provide general information about  the units involved, their organization, tactics and other relevant detail. In other chapters  the work concentrates  in detail on the developments in the Spanish and Portuguese campaigns in each year of the war.  Details of the composition of the armies in each campaign, their activities and battles, the size of the units if known, etc, in each year are provided. Attention is paid not only to the most famous engagement at Almanza but also to the other battles and skirmishes  of the Iberian campaigns.The book provides a complete guide to the forces fighting in Marlborough’s armies in Iberia. It will be a valuable addition to the library of both the casual reader and the serious history student with interest in this important part of British and European history. It not only offers  for the first time an overview of all the contributions to the war effort in Iberia, but also  presents the reader with a valuable contrast not only to Marlborough’s campaigns of the time, but also perhaps  to Wellington’s later campaign.

 

Dadson,  Trevor J. and J.H. Elliott, eds. Britain, Spain and the Treaty of Utrecht 1713-2013. London: Legenda, 2014.
Military chapters of note:
Elliott, J.H. “The Road to Utrecht: War and Peace.” In Britain, Spain and the Treaty of Utrecht 1713-2013, edited by Trevor J. Dadson and J.H. Elliott, 3–8`. London: Legenda, 2014.
Hoppit, Julian. “Party Politics and War Weariness in the Reign of Queen Anne.” In Britain, Spain and the Treaty of Utrecht 1713-2013, edited by Trevor J. Dadson and J.H. Elliott, 9–18. London: Legenda, 2014.
Palao Gil, Francisco Javier. “The Crown of Aragon in the War of the Spanish Succession.” In Britain, Spain and the Treaty of Utrecht 1713-2013, edited by Trevor J. Dadson and J.H. Elliott, 18–38. London: Legenda, 2014.
Storrs, Christopher. “Philip V and the Revival of Spain 1713-48.” In Britain, Spain and the Treaty of Utrecht 1713-2013, edited by Trevor J. Dadson and J.H. Elliott, 78–94. London: Legenda, 2014.
Pogăciaș, Andrei. “Chemical Warfare in the 18th Century? A Wallachian Chronicle and Other Written Sources about It.” Revista Arhivelor 2 (2016): 85–93.
Title kinda explains it all, doesn’t it?

 

And even further afield:
Noda, Jin. The Kazakh Khanates Between the Russian and Qing Empires: Central Eurasian International Relations During the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. Lam edition. Leiden ; Boston: Brill Academic Pub, 2016.
Abstract: In The Kazakh Khanates between the Russian and Qing Empires, Jin Noda examines the foreign relations of the Kazakh Chinggisid sultans and the Russian and Qing empires during the 18th and 19th centuries. Noda makes use of both Russian and Qing archival documents as well as local Islamic sources. Through analysis of each party’s claims –mainly reflected in the Russian-Qing negotiations regarding Central Eurasia–, the book describes the role played by the Kazakh nomads in tying together the three regions of eastern Kazakh steppe, Western Siberia, and Xinjiang.

 

As usual, many of these citations can also be found in the group Zotero bibliography.

 

* Assuming you hunt them down.

And the publications keep on coming

In case your “To Read” shelves (both real and virtual) have any empty space available. Doesn’t matter whether your inclinations are navally fiscal, memorably lowland, knowingly engineered, or absolutely official, there’s something for everyone.

Page, Anthony. “The Seventy Years War, 1744–1815, and Britain’s Fiscal-Naval State.” War & Society 34, no. 3 (August 1, 2015): 162–86.
Abstract:
This article argues that we should view Britain as fighting a ‘Seventy Years War’ with France between the battles of Fontenoy in 1745 and Waterloo in 1815. Through years of hot and cold war, Britain struggled to build the military power needed to prevent it from falling under the domination of France. In hindsight, many view the British as inevitable imperialists, confidently building towards their global empire of the nineteenth century. In reality, eighteenth-century Britons frequently fretted about the threat of invasion, military weakness, possible financial collapse, and potential revolution. Historical developments only look inevitable in hindsight and with the aid of the social sciences. The struggle to defend itself in Europe during the Seventy Years War saw Britain develop a ‘fiscal-naval state’ that built a global empire.
Van der Steen, Jasper. Memory Wars in the Low Countries, 1566-1700. Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2015.
Abstract:
The Revolt in the Netherlands erupted in 1566 and tore apart the Low Countries. In Memory Wars in the Low Countries, 1566-1700 Jasper van der Steen explains how public memories of the Revolt in the Habsburg Netherlands in the South and the Dutch Republic in the North diverged and became the objects of fierce contestation in domestic political struggles, on both sides of the border and throughout the seventeenth century. Against widespread assumptions about the supposed modernity of cultural memory Memory Wars argues that early modern public memory did not require the presence of state actors, nationalism and modern mass media in order to play a role of political importance in both North and South.
Martens, Pieter. “Engineers and the Circulation of Knowledge in the Spanish Netherlands.” In Embattled Territory: The Circulation of Knowledge In the Spanish Netherlands, edited by Sven Dupré, Bert De Munck, Werner Thomas, and Geert Vanpaemel. Gent: Academia Press, 2016.
Abstract:
The classical view of science in the Spanish Netherlands harbors implicit assumptions, which need to be reconsidered in the light of contemporary historiography. Approaching the history of science from the perspective of the circulation of knowledge, this book indicates new paths of research furthering the integration of the history of science into wider, general history. To accomplish this aim the book raises three sets of questions. The first question concerns the role of cities in the production and transmission of knowledge and skills in the Spanish Netherlands, with the Southern Netherlands being home to one of the densest urban networks in the world. In a second step, the book discusses how the Southern Netherlands were entangled with the rest of the globe through the Spanish Empire, and the Atlantic world in particular. How did these Iberian connections shape the circulation of knowledge in the Spanish Netherlands? Thirdly, did the definition and nature of knowledge change in the Spanish Netherlands and how was this related to processes of political and religious transformation? Focusing on urban knowledge, Iberian connections and the politics of knowledge, this book offers a new framework for the history of science in the Spanish Netherlands.
Thomas, Daniel. “The Final Years of the Constable of France, 1593–1627.” French Historical Studies 39, no. 1 (February 1, 2016): 73–103.
Abstract:
The abolition of the office of constable in 1627 has often been viewed as part of Richelieu’s supposed campaign against the excessive power of the high nobility, both within and without the royal army, and has been seen as an action that helped construct the system of “absolute monarchy” in France. Yet more recently questions have been raised about the real significance of the office’s suppression. Building on this debate, this article offers an examination of the vicissitudes of the office of constable between 1593 and 1627 to provide a more detailed portrait of this position and its powers during its final years. By doing so, the article also provides wider insight into the crucial relationships among royal offices, armed force, and the nobility in early modern France.
And did I mention yet another work on siege rituals? When it rains it pours, I guess.
Madunić, Domagoj. “Taming Mars: Customs, Rituals and Ceremonies in the Siege Operations in Dalmatia during the War for Crete (1645-69).” Hungarian Historical Review 4, no. 2 (2016): 445–70.
Abstract:
The main question of this study is how seventeenth-century European societies attempted to regulate the conduct of warfare. It deals with a peculiar aspect of seventeenth-century siege warfare, namely the customs, ceremonies and rituals that regulated various aspects of a siege, such as the observation of truces and immunities, the negotiation of surrenders, the treatment of prisoners etc. So far, most historians dealing with Early Modern siege warfare have been more concerned with its technical and operational aspects: the digging of trenches, the development of various elements of fortifications, wastage rates of combatants, hardships brought about by lack of food and epidemics, and so on, than they have been with these ” decorative elements ” of engagement. Nevertheless, these activities, although usually without any obvious operational military value, provided a medium for a discourse between the besieger and besieged and thus, as I argue, played an important role in the final outcome of a siege. Through descriptive analyses of three cases, each dealing with one siege operation in the Dalmatian theater of operations during the War for Crete (1645–69), this inquiry provides an account of customs, rituals, ceremonies and rules of ” proper ” conduct of a siege, with particular emphasis on the most critical part of a siege: the surrender of a fortified site.
And don’t forget to check in with the Zotero group bibliography (permanent link on right), which I update from time-to-time – especially in the French collection. I keep finding new (and old) things all the time.

But now I must hence to ruminating on things mercenary and logistical.

The social history of military technology

has a dedicated journal.

Vulcan flyer_Page_1

 

Vulcan flyer_Page_2

Or for a readable version, go here.